Cone Shells

See eArt Scans of Cone Shells
and computer generated
variations of Cone Shells
below
text on Cone Shells
HOME PAGE
MASTER INDEX
A variety of Cone Shells
from Cebu, Philippines
purchased February, 2002

"BEAUTIFUL but DEADLY"
might well be a brief description
of Cone (Conus) Shells


You may order prints of these lovely shells on the GIFT SHOP page.

Anyone who has ever looked upon a Cone Shell has been awed by the beauty of these marine snail's shells. Of all of the shells, while some may come close to matching their beauty, there are none more beautiful than the spectacular members of the Conus family of marine snails.

There is a great deal of information on Cone Shells on the net. The following are websites which you may wish to visit, in order to learn more of the beauty and danger of cone shells:
http://www.proctormuseum.us (go to Master Index; then to Snails; then to Cone Shells
http://grimwade.biochem.unimelb.edu.au/cone/index1.html

This is a notation from the following Australian Conchology site on Cone Shells:
http://grimwade.biochem.unimelb.edu.au/cone/index1.html

"Members of the Conidae family do not predate upon humans but will sting if disturbed. It is best to avoid contact with the cone shells completely, and collection of live specimens requires a permit.
If stung by a cone shell, obtain medical attention immediately (making note of a description of the cone shell if possible). If medical attention is unavailable and the victim becomes unconscious, observe their breathing constantly and apply assisted and artificial respiration when required until assistance can be found. In this way it may be possible to keep the victim alive while the body metabolizes the conotoxins."


Cone shells have existed for millions of years. Members of the PROCTOR MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY and the HOUSTON GEM & MINERAL SOCIETY dig Fossil Cone Shells (along with many other types of shells and marine life) Southwest of Bryan on the Highway to Caldwell, out of the River Bank of the Brazos River, below what is called "Whiskey Bridge". These are Middle Eocene epoch fossils in the Stone City Formation.




On this page we are showing you modern cone shells as
directly scanned into the computer using eART SCANNING.

Modern Cone Shells from Cebu, Philippines



Conus marmoreus
Cebu, Philippines
on Lavender Background
Item # -01
Conus figilinus
Cebu, Philippines
on Gold Background
Item # -02
Conus virgo
Cebu, Philippines
on Beige Background
Item # -03
Conus textile (Lyx)
Cebu, Philippines
on Lavender Background
Item # -04
Conus leopardus
Cebu, Philippines
on Lavender Background
Item # -05
Conus striatus
Cebu, Philippines
on Lavender Background
Item # -06
Conus mus
Cebu, Philippines
on Lavender Background
Item # -07
Conus (unknown sp.)
Cebu, Philippines
on Lavender Background
Item # -08
Conus (unknown sp.)
Florida, United States
on Lavender Background
Item # -09




Also on this page we are including some computer generated effects on a Middle Eocene age fossil cone shell (which Terry Proctor found in the Stone City formation of the Brazos River bank near "Whiskey Bridge" Southwest of Bryan, Brazos County, Texas).

Variations on Mid-Eocene Fossil
Cone Shell from Brazos River
Southwest of Bryan, Texas

Curly-Q Effect
Item # -01
Foil Effect
Item # -02
Enamel Effect
Item # -03
Negative Effect
Item # -04
Neon Glo Effect
Item # -05
Red on Black Effect
Item # -06
Noise Effect
Item # -07
Contours Effect
Item # -08
Tile Effect
Item # -09
Texture Effect
Item # -10
Granite Frame Effect
Item # -11
Rough Leather Effect
Item #-12
Brush Effect
Item # -13
Tile-Magenta Effect
Item # -14
Sharpened on
Yellow Effect
Item # -15
Straw Wall Effect
Item # -16
Fur Effect
Item # -17
This is the original
Cone Shell from the
Stone City Formation
from which all of these
Variations were made
Item #-18